["success",{"Blog":{"id":"108","title":"Hypothesis, Experiment, Results & Conclusions","intro":"","body":"

Why are you conducting R&D?<\/strong>
This may sound like a silly question, but some clients find it difficult to articulate what their R&D project and activities are and why they’re doing them. Under the program, the significant purpose<\/strong> for conducting R&D is to generate new knowledge<\/strong>, as we detailed in our July newsletter.

By following the simple step-by-step process defined in our Project Document (PD) succinctly describing your hypothesis, experimentation, the results and your conclusions, we can build a comprehensive document that cross-references evidentiary documentation to minimise potential confusion to the AusIndustry officer reviewing\/registering your application.

Hypothesis<\/strong>
As part of each experiment you undertake, a brief statement (hypothesis) explaining the technical or scientific idea being investigated, is required. It should be written clearly and explain what specifically is being tested that cannot be determined in advance without undertaken experimentation so it can be understood by people external to your project, industry or area of specialisation.

Remember, the significant purpose for conducting R&D under this program, is to generate new knowledge, so your hypothesis must detail the specific technical uncertainty, that can be proven right or wrong by conducting the experiment.

A good example of a clear, concise and easily understood hypothesis is:
“We hypothesise that a toy helicopter can be given verbal direction commands and associate the sounds through a newly developed core algorithm for speech recognition in the form of a voice trainable system.” <\/em>

Experimentation<\/strong>
If the hypothesis is the what, experimentation is the how. Again, a brief statement is required, roughly a paragraph or two, outlining the essential steps of your experimentation, what is being observed, how it is being observed and what conclusions you anticipate.

If your experimentation is continuing on from the previous year, it is important that you focus on the work carried out during the tax year for which you are making the claim. It is also important to identify if the experimentation has been undertaken internally, or by a third party\/contractor.

Example:
“We engaged a software engineer with experience in neural networks to develop algorithms to power the voice activation software. Existing neural networks were too large and memory intensive for the application, so bespoke algorithms needed to be developed and optimised for the purpose. For the purposes of our initial testing, the algorithms in the form of the coded software were loaded onto a PC. The software displayed arrows and crosses on the screen to indicate the command it had received either through the manual controller or through vocal commands. A team of twenty operators were selected with a range of different vocal characteristics and languages. The operators issued vocal commands into the microphone while moving the manual controller in the relevant direction to allow the software to form the associations. This was repeated a number of times for each command. The operators then only spoke the trained commends in a variety of vocal pitches and observed the results.”<\/em>

Results & Conclusions<\/strong>
Your results should report on the outcomes of the experiment and tie back into the hypothesis.
Your conclusion should include; whether more experiments\/testing is required, or if everything went well and you’re ready to progress to the next stage –and briefly, what will the next stage involve.

Example:
“After many failures and going back to the drawing board on the algorithms, an optimised neural network software successfully learned to recognise spoken commands after an average of four repetitions, with a wide range of tolerances for variations in the way the words were spoken. With the optimised software now successfully developed, the company was able to provide the memory requirements to its electrical contractor to be inserted into the helicopter headset controllers.” <\/em><\/p>","author":"","image":"ATCS_SPOW.png","submitted":"August 29, 2017"},"BlogTag":[{"id":"445","blog_id":"108","tag_id":"1","Blog":{"id":"108","title":"Hypothesis, Experiment, Results & Conclusions","intro":"","body":"

Why are you conducting R&D?<\/strong>
This may sound like a silly question, but some clients find it difficult to articulate what their R&D project and activities are and why they’re doing them. Under the program, the significant purpose<\/strong> for conducting R&D is to generate new knowledge<\/strong>, as we detailed in our July newsletter.

By following the simple step-by-step process defined in our Project Document (PD) succinctly describing your hypothesis, experimentation, the results and your conclusions, we can build a comprehensive document that cross-references evidentiary documentation to minimise potential confusion to the AusIndustry officer reviewing\/registering your application.

Hypothesis<\/strong>
As part of each experiment you undertake, a brief statement (hypothesis) explaining the technical or scientific idea being investigated, is required. It should be written clearly and explain what specifically is being tested that cannot be determined in advance without undertaken experimentation so it can be understood by people external to your project, industry or area of specialisation.

Remember, the significant purpose for conducting R&D under this program, is to generate new knowledge, so your hypothesis must detail the specific technical uncertainty, that can be proven right or wrong by conducting the experiment.

A good example of a clear, concise and easily understood hypothesis is:
“We hypothesise that a toy helicopter can be given verbal direction commands and associate the sounds through a newly developed core algorithm for speech recognition in the form of a voice trainable system.” <\/em>

Experimentation<\/strong>
If the hypothesis is the what, experimentation is the how. Again, a brief statement is required, roughly a paragraph or two, outlining the essential steps of your experimentation, what is being observed, how it is being observed and what conclusions you anticipate.

If your experimentation is continuing on from the previous year, it is important that you focus on the work carried out during the tax year for which you are making the claim. It is also important to identify if the experimentation has been undertaken internally, or by a third party\/contractor.

Example:
“We engaged a software engineer with experience in neural networks to develop algorithms to power the voice activation software. Existing neural networks were too large and memory intensive for the application, so bespoke algorithms needed to be developed and optimised for the purpose. For the purposes of our initial testing, the algorithms in the form of the coded software were loaded onto a PC. The software displayed arrows and crosses on the screen to indicate the command it had received either through the manual controller or through vocal commands. A team of twenty operators were selected with a range of different vocal characteristics and languages. The operators issued vocal commands into the microphone while moving the manual controller in the relevant direction to allow the software to form the associations. This was repeated a number of times for each command. The operators then only spoke the trained commends in a variety of vocal pitches and observed the results.”<\/em>

Results & Conclusions<\/strong>
Your results should report on the outcomes of the experiment and tie back into the hypothesis.
Your conclusion should include; whether more experiments\/testing is required, or if everything went well and you’re ready to progress to the next stage –and briefly, what will the next stage involve.

Example:
“After many failures and going back to the drawing board on the algorithms, an optimised neural network software successfully learned to recognise spoken commands after an average of four repetitions, with a wide range of tolerances for variations in the way the words were spoken. With the optimised software now successfully developed, the company was able to provide the memory requirements to its electrical contractor to be inserted into the helicopter headset controllers.” <\/em><\/p>","author":"","image":"ATCS_SPOW.png","submitted":"2017-08-29 14:28:00"},"Tag":{"id":"1","tag":"Development"}},{"id":"446","blog_id":"108","tag_id":"2","Blog":{"id":"108","title":"Hypothesis, Experiment, Results & Conclusions","intro":"","body":"

Why are you conducting R&D?<\/strong>
This may sound like a silly question, but some clients find it difficult to articulate what their R&D project and activities are and why they’re doing them. Under the program, the significant purpose<\/strong> for conducting R&D is to generate new knowledge<\/strong>, as we detailed in our July newsletter.

By following the simple step-by-step process defined in our Project Document (PD) succinctly describing your hypothesis, experimentation, the results and your conclusions, we can build a comprehensive document that cross-references evidentiary documentation to minimise potential confusion to the AusIndustry officer reviewing\/registering your application.

Hypothesis<\/strong>
As part of each experiment you undertake, a brief statement (hypothesis) explaining the technical or scientific idea being investigated, is required. It should be written clearly and explain what specifically is being tested that cannot be determined in advance without undertaken experimentation so it can be understood by people external to your project, industry or area of specialisation.

Remember, the significant purpose for conducting R&D under this program, is to generate new knowledge, so your hypothesis must detail the specific technical uncertainty, that can be proven right or wrong by conducting the experiment.

A good example of a clear, concise and easily understood hypothesis is:
“We hypothesise that a toy helicopter can be given verbal direction commands and associate the sounds through a newly developed core algorithm for speech recognition in the form of a voice trainable system.” <\/em>

Experimentation<\/strong>
If the hypothesis is the what, experimentation is the how. Again, a brief statement is required, roughly a paragraph or two, outlining the essential steps of your experimentation, what is being observed, how it is being observed and what conclusions you anticipate.

If your experimentation is continuing on from the previous year, it is important that you focus on the work carried out during the tax year for which you are making the claim. It is also important to identify if the experimentation has been undertaken internally, or by a third party\/contractor.

Example:
“We engaged a software engineer with experience in neural networks to develop algorithms to power the voice activation software. Existing neural networks were too large and memory intensive for the application, so bespoke algorithms needed to be developed and optimised for the purpose. For the purposes of our initial testing, the algorithms in the form of the coded software were loaded onto a PC. The software displayed arrows and crosses on the screen to indicate the command it had received either through the manual controller or through vocal commands. A team of twenty operators were selected with a range of different vocal characteristics and languages. The operators issued vocal commands into the microphone while moving the manual controller in the relevant direction to allow the software to form the associations. This was repeated a number of times for each command. The operators then only spoke the trained commends in a variety of vocal pitches and observed the results.”<\/em>

Results & Conclusions<\/strong>
Your results should report on the outcomes of the experiment and tie back into the hypothesis.
Your conclusion should include; whether more experiments\/testing is required, or if everything went well and you’re ready to progress to the next stage –and briefly, what will the next stage involve.

Example:
“After many failures and going back to the drawing board on the algorithms, an optimised neural network software successfully learned to recognise spoken commands after an average of four repetitions, with a wide range of tolerances for variations in the way the words were spoken. With the optimised software now successfully developed, the company was able to provide the memory requirements to its electrical contractor to be inserted into the helicopter headset controllers.” <\/em><\/p>","author":"","image":"ATCS_SPOW.png","submitted":"2017-08-29 14:28:00"},"Tag":{"id":"2","tag":"Research"}},{"id":"447","blog_id":"108","tag_id":"4","Blog":{"id":"108","title":"Hypothesis, Experiment, Results & Conclusions","intro":"","body":"

Why are you conducting R&D?<\/strong>
This may sound like a silly question, but some clients find it difficult to articulate what their R&D project and activities are and why they’re doing them. Under the program, the significant purpose<\/strong> for conducting R&D is to generate new knowledge<\/strong>, as we detailed in our July newsletter.

By following the simple step-by-step process defined in our Project Document (PD) succinctly describing your hypothesis, experimentation, the results and your conclusions, we can build a comprehensive document that cross-references evidentiary documentation to minimise potential confusion to the AusIndustry officer reviewing\/registering your application.

Hypothesis<\/strong>
As part of each experiment you undertake, a brief statement (hypothesis) explaining the technical or scientific idea being investigated, is required. It should be written clearly and explain what specifically is being tested that cannot be determined in advance without undertaken experimentation so it can be understood by people external to your project, industry or area of specialisation.

Remember, the significant purpose for conducting R&D under this program, is to generate new knowledge, so your hypothesis must detail the specific technical uncertainty, that can be proven right or wrong by conducting the experiment.

A good example of a clear, concise and easily understood hypothesis is:
“We hypothesise that a toy helicopter can be given verbal direction commands and associate the sounds through a newly developed core algorithm for speech recognition in the form of a voice trainable system.” <\/em>

Experimentation<\/strong>
If the hypothesis is the what, experimentation is the how. Again, a brief statement is required, roughly a paragraph or two, outlining the essential steps of your experimentation, what is being observed, how it is being observed and what conclusions you anticipate.

If your experimentation is continuing on from the previous year, it is important that you focus on the work carried out during the tax year for which you are making the claim. It is also important to identify if the experimentation has been undertaken internally, or by a third party\/contractor.

Example:
“We engaged a software engineer with experience in neural networks to develop algorithms to power the voice activation software. Existing neural networks were too large and memory intensive for the application, so bespoke algorithms needed to be developed and optimised for the purpose. For the purposes of our initial testing, the algorithms in the form of the coded software were loaded onto a PC. The software displayed arrows and crosses on the screen to indicate the command it had received either through the manual controller or through vocal commands. A team of twenty operators were selected with a range of different vocal characteristics and languages. The operators issued vocal commands into the microphone while moving the manual controller in the relevant direction to allow the software to form the associations. This was repeated a number of times for each command. The operators then only spoke the trained commends in a variety of vocal pitches and observed the results.”<\/em>

Results & Conclusions<\/strong>
Your results should report on the outcomes of the experiment and tie back into the hypothesis.
Your conclusion should include; whether more experiments\/testing is required, or if everything went well and you’re ready to progress to the next stage –and briefly, what will the next stage involve.

Example:
“After many failures and going back to the drawing board on the algorithms, an optimised neural network software successfully learned to recognise spoken commands after an average of four repetitions, with a wide range of tolerances for variations in the way the words were spoken. With the optimised software now successfully developed, the company was able to provide the memory requirements to its electrical contractor to be inserted into the helicopter headset controllers.” <\/em><\/p>","author":"","image":"ATCS_SPOW.png","submitted":"2017-08-29 14:28:00"},"Tag":{"id":"4","tag":"Eligibility"}},{"id":"448","blog_id":"108","tag_id":"22","Blog":{"id":"108","title":"Hypothesis, Experiment, Results & Conclusions","intro":"","body":"

Why are you conducting R&D?<\/strong>
This may sound like a silly question, but some clients find it difficult to articulate what their R&D project and activities are and why they’re doing them. Under the program, the significant purpose<\/strong> for conducting R&D is to generate new knowledge<\/strong>, as we detailed in our July newsletter.

By following the simple step-by-step process defined in our Project Document (PD) succinctly describing your hypothesis, experimentation, the results and your conclusions, we can build a comprehensive document that cross-references evidentiary documentation to minimise potential confusion to the AusIndustry officer reviewing\/registering your application.

Hypothesis<\/strong>
As part of each experiment you undertake, a brief statement (hypothesis) explaining the technical or scientific idea being investigated, is required. It should be written clearly and explain what specifically is being tested that cannot be determined in advance without undertaken experimentation so it can be understood by people external to your project, industry or area of specialisation.

Remember, the significant purpose for conducting R&D under this program, is to generate new knowledge, so your hypothesis must detail the specific technical uncertainty, that can be proven right or wrong by conducting the experiment.

A good example of a clear, concise and easily understood hypothesis is:
“We hypothesise that a toy helicopter can be given verbal direction commands and associate the sounds through a newly developed core algorithm for speech recognition in the form of a voice trainable system.” <\/em>

Experimentation<\/strong>
If the hypothesis is the what, experimentation is the how. Again, a brief statement is required, roughly a paragraph or two, outlining the essential steps of your experimentation, what is being observed, how it is being observed and what conclusions you anticipate.

If your experimentation is continuing on from the previous year, it is important that you focus on the work carried out during the tax year for which you are making the claim. It is also important to identify if the experimentation has been undertaken internally, or by a third party\/contractor.

Example:
“We engaged a software engineer with experience in neural networks to develop algorithms to power the voice activation software. Existing neural networks were too large and memory intensive for the application, so bespoke algorithms needed to be developed and optimised for the purpose. For the purposes of our initial testing, the algorithms in the form of the coded software were loaded onto a PC. The software displayed arrows and crosses on the screen to indicate the command it had received either through the manual controller or through vocal commands. A team of twenty operators were selected with a range of different vocal characteristics and languages. The operators issued vocal commands into the microphone while moving the manual controller in the relevant direction to allow the software to form the associations. This was repeated a number of times for each command. The operators then only spoke the trained commends in a variety of vocal pitches and observed the results.”<\/em>

Results & Conclusions<\/strong>
Your results should report on the outcomes of the experiment and tie back into the hypothesis.
Your conclusion should include; whether more experiments\/testing is required, or if everything went well and you’re ready to progress to the next stage –and briefly, what will the next stage involve.

Example:
“After many failures and going back to the drawing board on the algorithms, an optimised neural network software successfully learned to recognise spoken commands after an average of four repetitions, with a wide range of tolerances for variations in the way the words were spoken. With the optimised software now successfully developed, the company was able to provide the memory requirements to its electrical contractor to be inserted into the helicopter headset controllers.” <\/em><\/p>","author":"","image":"ATCS_SPOW.png","submitted":"2017-08-29 14:28:00"},"Tag":{"id":"22","tag":"newsletter"}},{"id":"449","blog_id":"108","tag_id":"37","Blog":{"id":"108","title":"Hypothesis, Experiment, Results & Conclusions","intro":"","body":"

Why are you conducting R&D?<\/strong>
This may sound like a silly question, but some clients find it difficult to articulate what their R&D project and activities are and why they’re doing them. Under the program, the significant purpose<\/strong> for conducting R&D is to generate new knowledge<\/strong>, as we detailed in our July newsletter.

By following the simple step-by-step process defined in our Project Document (PD) succinctly describing your hypothesis, experimentation, the results and your conclusions, we can build a comprehensive document that cross-references evidentiary documentation to minimise potential confusion to the AusIndustry officer reviewing\/registering your application.

Hypothesis<\/strong>
As part of each experiment you undertake, a brief statement (hypothesis) explaining the technical or scientific idea being investigated, is required. It should be written clearly and explain what specifically is being tested that cannot be determined in advance without undertaken experimentation so it can be understood by people external to your project, industry or area of specialisation.

Remember, the significant purpose for conducting R&D under this program, is to generate new knowledge, so your hypothesis must detail the specific technical uncertainty, that can be proven right or wrong by conducting the experiment.

A good example of a clear, concise and easily understood hypothesis is:
“We hypothesise that a toy helicopter can be given verbal direction commands and associate the sounds through a newly developed core algorithm for speech recognition in the form of a voice trainable system.” <\/em>

Experimentation<\/strong>
If the hypothesis is the what, experimentation is the how. Again, a brief statement is required, roughly a paragraph or two, outlining the essential steps of your experimentation, what is being observed, how it is being observed and what conclusions you anticipate.

If your experimentation is continuing on from the previous year, it is important that you focus on the work carried out during the tax year for which you are making the claim. It is also important to identify if the experimentation has been undertaken internally, or by a third party\/contractor.

Example:
“We engaged a software engineer with experience in neural networks to develop algorithms to power the voice activation software. Existing neural networks were too large and memory intensive for the application, so bespoke algorithms needed to be developed and optimised for the purpose. For the purposes of our initial testing, the algorithms in the form of the coded software were loaded onto a PC. The software displayed arrows and crosses on the screen to indicate the command it had received either through the manual controller or through vocal commands. A team of twenty operators were selected with a range of different vocal characteristics and languages. The operators issued vocal commands into the microphone while moving the manual controller in the relevant direction to allow the software to form the associations. This was repeated a number of times for each command. The operators then only spoke the trained commends in a variety of vocal pitches and observed the results.”<\/em>

Results & Conclusions<\/strong>
Your results should report on the outcomes of the experiment and tie back into the hypothesis.
Your conclusion should include; whether more experiments\/testing is required, or if everything went well and you’re ready to progress to the next stage –and briefly, what will the next stage involve.

Example:
“After many failures and going back to the drawing board on the algorithms, an optimised neural network software successfully learned to recognise spoken commands after an average of four repetitions, with a wide range of tolerances for variations in the way the words were spoken. With the optimised software now successfully developed, the company was able to provide the memory requirements to its electrical contractor to be inserted into the helicopter headset controllers.” <\/em><\/p>","author":"","image":"ATCS_SPOW.png","submitted":"2017-08-29 14:28:00"},"Tag":{"id":"37","tag":"R&D Tax"}}]}]