["success",{"Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"July 27, 2017"},"BlogTag":[{"id":"401","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"1","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"1","tag":"Development"}},{"id":"402","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"2","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"2","tag":"Research"}},{"id":"403","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"4","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"4","tag":"Eligibility"}},{"id":"404","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"8","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"8","tag":"Budget"}},{"id":"405","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"10","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"10","tag":"Claim"}},{"id":"406","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"11","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"11","tag":"company"}},{"id":"407","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"12","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"12","tag":"Deadline"}},{"id":"408","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"13","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"13","tag":"Expenditure"}},{"id":"409","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"22","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"22","tag":"newsletter"}},{"id":"410","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"25","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"25","tag":"record keeping"}},{"id":"411","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"33","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"33","tag":"Updates"}},{"id":"412","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"35","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"35","tag":"review"}},{"id":"413","blog_id":"105","tag_id":"37","Blog":{"id":"105","title":"Generating New Knowledge through Experimentation","intro":"","body":"

The R&D Tax Incentive is designed to encourage industry to conduct experimental activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge.
This doesn’t mean simply inventing something new or never seen before, it can mean improving existing materials, products, devices, processes or services.
While there may be many purposes for conducting an experiment, generating new knowledge needs to be a significant purpose for your R&D activities to be eligible under the program.
It is critical you maintain contemporaneous records which were prepared at the time the activity was carried out to support the work performed. Work for which you have no relevant supporting evidence will likely be disallowed.
Examples could include records such as; internet searches undertaken to establish the knowledge gap, design documents, CAD & technical drawings, staff time sheets, finding reports, test protocols, data, results, analysis and conclusions, minutes of meetings, emails between staff and contractors discussing technical uncertainties\/failures\/issues, clearly labelled photographic evidence or videos, prototype construction documents validating the design and describing the success\/failure relative to the initial proposed design, and the list goes on.
These documents should not be prepared retrospectively, and MUST be time stamped, dated and, in some instances, signed.<\/strong><\/em>
NOTE<\/u><\/strong>:<\/strong> The earlier you document your technical challenges the easier (and more efficient) it will be to make your R&D claim.<\/p>","author":"ATCS","image":"Knowledge_Brain.jpg","submitted":"2017-07-27 11:24:00"},"Tag":{"id":"37","tag":"R&D Tax"}}]}]